March 21, 2010

Haiga 320



Haiku by Peter Yovu.
I do not know much about Yovu, except that he lives somewhere in Vermont, US.
If anybody knows his bio, please let me know.

For this haiga, I picked an old European painting. I then moved the arm of the lady in such a way that she waves it.
The lady is probably just holding the folds of her skirt, but looks like she is pregnant.

5 comments:

snowbird said...

Check out The Haiku Foundation for Peter's info.

Gillena Cox said...

interesting haiga; subject from an equally interesting painting

The Arnolfini Portrait... oil painting on oak panel dated 1434...
This painting was long believed to be a portrait of Giovanni di Arrigo Arnolfini and his wife Giovanna Cenami in a Flemish bedchamber, but it was established in 1997 that they were married in 1447, thirteen years after the date on the painting and six years after van Eyck's death. It is now believed that the subject is Giovanni di Arrigo's cousin Giovanni di Nicolao Arnolfini and his wife. This is either an undocumented second wife, or, according to a recent proposal, his first wife Costanza Trenta, who had died by February 1433.This would make the painting partly a memorial portrait, showing one living and one dead person. Giovanni di Nicolao Arnolfini was an Italian merchant, originally from Lucca, but resident in Bruges since at least 1419.He is the subject of a further portrait by Van Eyck in Berlin, leading to speculation he was a friend of the artist.
More Here

much love
gillena

Rudi Pfaller said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Rudi Pfaller said...

The editing of the image is perfect in a technical sense. But I've got a problem with the original composition of the painting, of its harmony. It seems to me that this arm could be a prothesis, an appendix. I think we should be carefull in editing masterworks of old paintings. Some seem to me untouchable.
Best wishes
Rudi

kuni_san said...

Thanks for Pete's info.

Cox san, thanks for the info behind the painting. There is always some interesting story behind old artworks.

Rudi san, no offense intended.